squirrel-id.jpg Dramatization by Cafe Arcane (LSU Daily Reveille) Greg Joubert held his recently found Tiger Card Monday on the Union’s front steps. It was the same card a squirrel stole 2 1/2 weeks ago near Joubert’s Louise Garig dorm room. Joubert, industrial engineering freshman, recovered the card shortly before leaving for spring break from East Laville’s lost and found. “It was found by a tree near East Laville,” said Joubert, who transferred to the University from Georgia Tech this semester. Meagan Stewart, Joubert’s girlfriend and communication studies freshman, said an anonymous student turned his card in to East Laville’s front desk, where she works.

Mystech: Harmless rodents my butt. Once again we see how squirrels are expanding into all manner of criminal activity; in this case Identity Theft.

“I was going to take my shift, and one of the guys said, ‘I found squirrel boy’s ID,’” Stewart said.

Stewart said the student found the card in the garden in front of the dormitory.

“[The squirrel] somehow got the ID to East Laville,” Joubert said.

Joubert said he dropped his ID card from his third-floor window to his girlfriend below him on the ground. He said the card landed on the ground, and before Stewart could get the card, a squirrel snatched it and climbed a nearby tree.

“She heard a chirping noise and saw this flash,” Joubert said. “I guess he was thinking he could make a home out of it.”

Stewart said she was bringing Joubert some groceries when Joubert dropped the card to her.

“The sun was in my eyes, and I saw a blur,” Stewart said. “I heard the ID land, and it happened really fast.”

Stewart said she saw a squirrel dart up a tree with something in its mouth.

Joubert said he had heard about the aggressive nature of local squirrel before transferring to the University.

“I just got here this semester, and I heard before how crazy the squirrel were,” Joubert said.

Joubert said he has received attention from the squirrel incident.

“I never thought it would turn into this two weeks later,” Joubert said.

He said some friends from Atlanta, where he attended Georgia Tech last semester, heard about the squirrel’s crime and Joubert’s misfortune.

The squirrel’s theft had instigated a complaint by a Residential Life administrator, which was later followed with apologies.

“I got an e-mail apologizing later followed by a phone call,” Joubert said. “It was awesome that Residential Life was asking me for forgiveness.”

Joubert replaced his card shortly after it was stolen.

“What was funny was getting the new ID card,” Joubert said. “I said, ‘The squirrel took my ID. Do I still have to pay for a new one?’”

Joubert paid $15 to replace his squirrel-stolen card.

Joubert said he has learned his lesson.

“I haven’t thrown my card out of the window since,” Joubert said. “I come down the stairs for now on.”